Along Arizona and Nevada’s border sits the Hoover Dam, an immaculate project designed to give water and hydroelectric energy to a large part of that region. Taking advantage of the immense power generated by the Colorado River, California-based entrepreneur and thoughtful philanthropist Kenny Slaught acknowledges the impact of the miraculous architectural structure on the communities’ supply of water and power resources. Slaught has recently went on about Hoover Dam on his blog at KennySlaught.com, stressing that the massive water payload of the dam pushed forward some of America’s most deserted outposts into fast growing economies.  

Read more: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/kenny-slaught-societal-importance-hoover-230600215.html

A United States architectural drive better known as the Spanish Colonial Revival architecture originated in the early 20th century. The movement covered planning certain cities that were the previous Spanish colonies, which then became American cities, executing the Spanish architectural style. A key part of this architectural style can be noticed in California. Santa Barbara used this style as its symbolic line for re-designing the city after an earthquake that occurred in1925.  Architect George Washington Smith shifted to Montecito and popularized this movement introduced this style. The history of El Pueblo Viejo aesthetic control remains associated to the Roman and Parisian laws. It tries to keep history intact through the Hispanic architecture. But you may wonder what the Hispanic Architecture is all about. This style is generally influenced by the architecture of the “white-washed cities” of Andalusia in Southern Spain. In Santa Barbara, local building procedures are a product of the natural environment and the materials available in the area. Kenny Slaught further says that Hispanic architectural types in this area are depicted by the “minimalism, rural economy, excellence in craftsmanship and direct expression of material”. Designs witnessed in Santa Barbara demonstrate local handmade quality connected to the sunlight. Besides, colors are also parallel to the natural environment, yellow, red, orange and white that remains Santa Barbara’s weather.

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Santa Barbara attracts a great number of tourists every year because of its charming weather, astounding landscapes and mostly for its rich architectural legacy. Santa Barbara’s constriction designs do share the similarity of the normal American architecture because its origins came up from the Spanish constructions during the colonization period. As a result of the city’s untouched architecture shown by the touch of ancient days, historic preservation was considered a mandatory element in the city planning process. Santa Barbara was one of the major communities in the United States that advanced the development of historical architectural patterns and trends. Famous property developer and successful businessman, Kenny Slaught has provided deep insights on the history of Santa Barbara’s architecture by drawing upon the timeline of events that took place in the area. On his blog at KennySlaughtNews.com, the industry executive has shared a short chronology of milestones to address the interest of readers to know more about the backgrounds of local architecture.    

Read more: http://markets.financialcontent.com/investplace/news/read/34182503/Kenny_Slaught_ 

Kenny Slaught endorses the initiatives of Hospice of Santa Barbara, as they build an active support network at local school campuses of all levels, from elementary school to college. Volunteers visit campuses and build weekly support groups for students suffering traumatic or complex scenarios and requiring a safe space with which to discuss their thoughts and feelings. On-campus groups aim to create open atmospheres that encourage openness and boost critical coping skills. Effective coping skills help adolescents avoid drugs, alcohol, and other forms of self-medication. In addition to direct interaction with students, the hospice volunteers offer training for faculty and staff members about how to communicate with students who are dealing with trauma and how to handle their questions about death, most notably violent deaths and suicide. Each of the 65 schools in the Hospice of Santa Barbara network can call on the services throughout the year to respond to a traumatic situation quickly and successfully.

Read more: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/kenny-slaught-promotes-hospice-santa-035900593.html

Hoover Dam, located on the border in the middle of the states of Arizona and Nevada, in the United States, is an amazing project planned to give water and hydroelectric energy to a sizeable part of that region, making use of the vast power generated by the Colorado River. California-based real estate expert and mindful philanthropist Kenny Slaught recognizes the effect of the astonishing architectural structure on the communities’ ease of access to water and power resources. On his blog at KennySlaught.com, Slaught has recently stated that Hoover Dam’s massive water capacity has helped transform some of America’s most deserted outposts into burgeoning economies.  

Read more: http://markets.financialcontent.com/startribune/news/read/33814702/Kenny_Slaught_

Kenny Slaught explains that Grand Challenges Explorations (GCE) funds citizens worldwide to explore ideas that can evolve how humanity approaches persistent global health and development challenges. GCE is a $100 million campaign funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and was launched in 2008. Over 1,186 projects in above 61 countries have received GCE grants. All people from any organization can apply for the GCE grant program. There is a brief two-page online application and no preliminary data required. Initial grants of $100,000 are awarded twice per year. Successful applicants then have the opportunity to receive a follow-on grant of up to $1 million.

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Hospice of Santa Barbara serves not just for those facing terminal and chronic illness, but also provides support to their families. Many of the programs at the organization are built for children struggling with the impending or recent passing of a family member. Kenny Slaught notes that about 20 percent of children experience the death of a loved one prior to turning 18, and one in 20 children facing the death of one or both parents before prior to adulthood. Hospice of Santa Barbara has been working to provide individuals in these situations with complimentary support via numerous programs and help these individuals cope with grief so they can avoid or mitigate depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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The Spanish Colonial Revival architecture was first developed in the early 20th century in the US. Spanish Colonial architecture was already found in some cities that were first Spanish colonies and then they became American cities. A lot of this style can be found in California, and when an earthquake that occurred in 1925, Santa Barbara utilized this style as its signature line for re-designing the city.  The movement was started by architect George Washington Smith who arrived in Montecito. The history of El Pueblo Viejo aesthetic control stemmed from Roman and Parisian laws. It hopes to preserve history via Hispanic architecture. What is the Hispanic Architecture about? This style is largely influenced by the architecture of the “white-washed cities” of Andalusia in Southern Spain. In Santa Barbara, historical buildings born from the response of the natural environment melded with the locally available materials. Kenny Slaught explains that Hispanic architectural styles in this area are in large part noted by the “simplicity, rustic economy, excellence in craftsmanship and honest expression of material”.  Santa Barbara conveys vernacular handmade quality oriented to the sun with colors related with natural environment, yellow, red, orange and white that defines Santa Barbara.

Read more: http://markets.financialcontent.com/mng-lang.dailynews/news/read/34182503/Kenny_Slaught_

Santa Barbara is a tourist city that brings in thousands of visitors every year. Mostly known for its ideal weather, stunning landscapes and impressively rich architectural legacy, Santa Barbara’s constriction designs do not repeat the similarity of the conventional American architecture. Its origins have emerged from the Spanish constructions during colonization. Thanks to the city’s impeccable skyline characterized by the touch of ancient days, historic preservation was integrated as an integral element in the city planning process. Santa Barbara was one of the first areas in the United States that further elaborated on the historical footprint observed in the local architectural patterns and styles. Renowned property developer and successful businessman, Kenny Slaught has reflected on the history of Santa Barbara’s architecture by remembering the chronology of events that took place in the area. At KennySlaughtNews.com, the entrepreneur has shared a short timeline of milestone happenings in order to help expedite curious readers’ search for knowledge about the city.

Read more: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/kenny-slaught-historical-events-influenced-215900075.html

Going nearly a century back, famous architect George Washington Smith kicked off the California movement of Spanish Colonial revival. Smith dropped out of Harvard. He eventually worked as a bond trader. After becoming a successful businessman, he relocated to Santa Barbara for the relaxing lifestyle and planned to work on his painting habits. But he was surprised when he learned that the city was enchanted by the house he had designed, urging him to continue crafting architectural works for many Californians. He brought authentic materials from Spain to pursue both new and old world styles. Today Smith’s structures are appreciated and enjoyed for their structural beauty and complex look, and he is remembered as a founding father in Santa Barbara. Many generations of architects have followed his artistic path, with Kenny Slaught appreciating the sharp eye and attention to detail one must possess to create structures of such renown.

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